Can I Have A Medicare Advantage Plan and a Supplemental Plan?

In the world of health insurance, a common question often arises: can you have both a Medicare Advantage Plan and a supplemental (Medigap) plan? The straightforward answer is no. Medicare Advantage Plans and Medigap policies serve the purpose of supplementing Original Medicare, but they are not designed to work together. If you enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan, you should discontinue any Medigap policy you have. Understanding the differences between these plans is crucial to making an informed decision about your healthcare coverage.

What is A Medicare Supplement Plan?

A Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap) plan, as the name suggests, supplements your Original Medicare benefits. It covers out-of-pocket costs such as deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments that are not covered under Original Medicare (Parts A and B). These plans, sold by private insurance companies, can also offer benefits that Original Medicare doesn’t cover, like medical care when you travel outside the U.S. It’s important to note, however, that Medigap policies generally don’t cover long-term care, vision or dental care, hearing aids, eyeglasses, or private-duty nursing. Choosing a Medigap policy is about balancing your health needs and your budget, as the premiums can vary from one insurance company to another.

The 80/20 coinsurance provision is another key aspect to understand in this discussion. Under Original Medicare, once you’ve met your deductible, Medicare pays 80% of the approved amount for your doctor services, outpatient therapy, and durable medical equipment (Part B). The remaining 20% is your responsibility, and this is what’s referred to as coinsurance. This 20% can be a significant amount, particularly for more expensive treatments and procedures.

This is where a Medigap policy can be beneficial. One of the primary functions of a Medigap policy is to assist in covering this 20% coinsurance portion that is owed. Depending on the specific Medigap plan you choose, it may cover all or a large portion of this coinsurance, reducing your out-of-pocket costs. So, while you cannot hold both a Medicare Advantage Plan and a Medigap policy simultaneously, understanding how they each work can help you make the best choice for your healthcare needs.

What is A Medicare Advantage Plan?

A Medicare Advantage Plan, also known as Part C, is a type of health insurance plan provided by private insurance companies that contract with Medicare. These plans encompass both Part A (Hospital Insurance) and Part B (Medical Insurance), and often include prescription drug coverage (Part D). In addition to the coverage provided by Original Medicare, many Medicare Advantage Plans also offer extra benefits such as vision, hearing, and dental coverage.

These plans operate like traditional HMOs or PPOs, with a network of doctors and hospitals. The beneficiaries typically pay a monthly premium in addition to their Part B premium, and are also responsible for any co-payments or coinsurance costs. An important thing to note is that the terms and coverage details can vary significantly between different Medicare Advantage Plans.

Can I Have Both Medicare Advantage and Medicare Supplement

No, you cannot have both a Medicare Supplement (Medigap) plan and a Medicare Advantage Plan at the same time. It’s worth noting that it’s illegal for anyone to sell you a Medigap policy if you have a Medicare Advantage Plan, unless you’re switching back to Original Medicare. The reasoning is simple: Medicare Advantage Plans are an alternative to Original Medicare, covering everything that Parts A and B would cover, and often more.Thus, the supplemental coverage offered by Medigap policies – which is designed to fill the gaps in coverage left by Original Medicare – is unnecessary. It’s crucial to understand your healthcare needs and the coverage each plan provides when deciding between a Medicare Advantage Plan and a Medigap policy.